Professional Engineers Of North Carolina

SPR 2014

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15 Spring 2014 the Professional Engineer ways to divide the pie will put money where it is most efective, but we're not addressing long-term transportation needs that impact quality of life, safety and the business climate. How it works Te formula classifes projects into three categories: statewide, regional and division. Projects of statewide signifcance will receive 40% of available revenue, or about $6 billion over 10 years. Supposedly 100% data-driven, project selection will be based on factors such as trafc volumes, economic competitiveness and freight movement — with an eye toward improving logistics and economic-develop- ment opportunities throughout the state. Projects of regional signifcance will see about $4.5 billion over 10 years, or 30% of available revenue. Projects in this category will compete within specifc regions comprised of two Transportation Divisions of the N.C. Department of Transportation. Project selec- tion will be based 70% on data, while local rankings by local planning organizations (MPOs/RPOs) and the NCDOT Transportation Divisions will account for the remaining 30%. Lastly, 30% (or $4.5 billion over 10 years) is reserved for projects at the Division level, an amount to be shared equally among the state's 14 Transporta- tion Divisions. Tese are projects that address safety, congestion and connectivity on the local level and selection will be based 50% on data and 50% on local rankings. The state of transportation North Carolina is the fourth-fastest growing state in the nation. More cars and drivers and more businesses (including heavy trucks) will be using its roads each year. And because of the limited fow of revenue from reduced fuel usage — driven by the economic downturn as well as fuel efciency — our transportation system struggles to keep pace with demands. According to the American Society of Civil Engineers 2013 Infrastructure Report Card, 2,192 (12.1%) of the 18,165 bridges in North Carolina are considered structurally defcient and 3,296 (18.1%) are considered functionally obsolete. It is worth noting that in recent years, thanks to funding from the General Assembly, North Carolina has made great headway in addressing bridge needs. However, driving on roads in need of repair costs Tar Heel Statewide Regional Division 40% 30% 30% About 15 billion over 10 years $6 billion Project selection will be based on factors such as traffc volumes, economic competitiveness and freight movement. $4.5 billion Projects will compete within specifc regions comprised of two transportation divisions of the N.C. Department of Transportation. $4.5 billion Amount to be shared equally among the state's 14 transportation divisions addressing safety, congestion and connectivity. State transportation infrastructure funding formula According to the American Society of Civil Engineers 2013 Infrastructure Report Card, of the 18,165 bridges in North Carolina: 2,192 (12.1%) are considered structurally defcient 3,296 (18.1%) are considered functionally obsolete Concepts_Winter14.indd 15 3/27/14 11:34 AM

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