North Carolina Economic Development Guide

2014

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While Charlotte Douglas International Airport is a global hub for passenger service, it also handled more than 127,000 tons of freight in 2012. That will grow when a new $92 million intermodal rail yard, where shipping containers move between trains and trucks, is completed. Norfolk, Va.-based railroad Norfolk Southern Corp. is building the 200-acre yard, which will replace a smaller one nearby and increases annual "lifts" from 130,000 to 200,000. City leaders say it will make Charlotte an inland cargo hub. Strong infrastructure builds reliable supply chains, which are critical to foodprocessing companies. Rural communities use that infrastructure to make their less expensive land — distribution centers use a lot of it — and inexpensive labor — workers don't demand big-city wages — resonate with manufacturers. And country roads allow trucks to roll, not sit in traffc. That has been the case in Maxton, where Campbell Soup Co. maintains busy distribution and manufacturing operations. The Camden, N.J.-based company arrived in the town that straddles the Robeson-Scotland county line in 1978 and has expanded since. In 2010, it added a $29.8 million production line and 100 jobs to the more than 800 it had there. Not far away in Pembroke, Charlottebased Trinity Frozen Foods LLC will invest the past, locally grown sweet potatoes — North Carolina is the top producer in the country — were trucked to Montreal for processing before returning for distribution. U.S. plants are in the West, where most white potatoes are grown. "Part of our decision to come to Robeson County was the availability of good refrigerated trucking and cold-storage facilities here," says Jere "Part of our decision to come to Robeson County was the availability of good refrigerated trucking and cold-storage facilities here." $15 million and create about 150 jobs within three years to produce frozen sweet-potato french fries. Its processing plant will start by cutting 12 million to 15 million pounds of fries a year, eventually increasing to more than 50 million to meet demand for the relatively new product. In Null, Trinity's president and CEO. Pork and poultry producers in the state require those same tools. "Sweet potatoes are an important crop in North Carolina. Our plans got the attention of Raleigh." Gov. Pat McCrory, Commerce Secretary Sharon Decker and Commis- If We Can Host 350,000 People At A Time, Imagine What We Can Do For Your 35 Email BStewart@homeofgolf.com or call (800) 346-5362 Ext. 237 to plan your meeting. homeofgolf.com/promo/bnc Rest assured your meeting won't be the largest ever held in the Pinehurst, Southern Pines, Aberdeen Area of North Carolina. In 2014, we'll welcome the USGA's first-ever back-to-back Men's and Women's U.S. Open Championships*. Does that make your smaller gathering any less important to us? Far from it. It's those more intimate events that have presented us with ConventionSouth Magazine's Readers' Choice Award four times. We'll even offer customized services by our Director of Sales, Beverly Stewart. Call her and she'll provide unbiased counsel to help you plan for just the right meeting facilities, lodging and restaurants. Your best meeting ever will be at The Home of American Golf®. Scan here for assistance with your meeting or group *at Pinehurst No. 2

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